Archive for June, 2014

Update: Canadian Venues

Posted in 2013, 2014, canada, tour dates, underground with tags , , , on June 27, 2014 by blackmetallurgy

Last year I posted this about how small venues in Canada were going to charge an exorbitant tour tax for international bands and musicians, putting a real dent in the ability of low and mid-tier bands (and even top-tier metal bands a lot of times) to tour there. Well, I just got an email regarding that particular petition, and the tour tax is not going to go into effect. So score for underground music, and score for live music in general!

-Hagalaz

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KING DIAMOND IS TOURING!

Posted in denmark, tour dates, traditional heavy metal, united states with tags , , , on June 23, 2014 by blackmetallurgy

You guys! King Diamond is going on tour! Like, really! And J gets to see him on the first date, lucky bastard.

You can check to see how close King will be getting to you on his website. And anywhere is close enough, honestly- I’m going to Chi-Town for it. I don’t really know how, yet, but dammit, I’m going to see this.

Ave.

-H

Hail Spirit Noir and Patria Reviews

Posted in burning fist, Reviews on June 19, 2014 by blackmetallurgy

I have two more reviews up at Burning Fist! Hail Spirit Noir’s Oi Magoi and Patria’s Individualism! I also just put the finishing touches on a review of the new Mayhem… They will get that one, which I will of course link to, but I’ll do the new Triptykon over here.

I’m going to be trying to do a few reviews of big new albums that are coming out this year, as well as some of our more local bands in the Cities that are starting to make quite a name for themselves. Several of our bands have new releases, and I want to make sure and get those in there too as well as the more well-known stuff (and the new-new stuff, like Domains).

Ave.

SLAAAAYYYYER!

Posted in band spotlight, thrash, united states with tags , , , on June 6, 2014 by blackmetallurgy

Happy Slayer Day, folks.

Because there’s never not a good excuse to listen to Slayer.

 

Happy Belated 20th Birthday, De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas!

Posted in 2014, black metal, black metal history, mayhem, norway, true norwegian black metal with tags , , , , , on June 4, 2014 by blackmetallurgy

I remember the first time I heard Mayhem. It was probably November of 2009, and I was sitting on the floor in my room in my home town, my laptop on the floor beside me, wrapping a Christmas gift for my mom (Yes, it was early. I was living at home that year and I wasn’t home when she wasn’t very often. I had to seize the moment). I had just begun to delve deeper into black metal that wouldn’t get me made fun of, and I’d been marveling at Marduk and jamming out to Immortal on Pandora all day. And I had heard about Mayhem (I’d heard PLENTY; 21 year old me was pretty squeamish, and I wasn’t sure how I felt about the whole thing), but I had a hard time imagining that they could really be all that good. After all, they were famous for dying prematurely, yes?

And then Funeral Fog came on my Pandora station. It was love at first blastbeat. I grabbed my laptop, and by the time the song was over, Amazon.com was processing my order of De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas.

Mayhem’s first full-length record has awed, inspired, and baffled metal fans the world over in its 20 year life span. While many aspects of the music are inexplicable (a friend of mine told me that he just couldn’t seem to figure out “what Attila was going for with those vocals” no matter how much he listens to it), huge swaths of the thing’s history are just flat out unsettling. For instance, DMDS remains, to this day, the only record on which a murderer plays alongside his victim. Not to mention the fact that the lyrics to Life Eternal are part of Dead’s suicide note (I’m still trying to decide if I find that inclusion sweet or creepy). But despite its struggles the little album that barely could has become an integral part of black metal history, and remains required listening for anyone remotely into extreme metal.

And while yes, I am sure, we would have all loved to hear Dead’s vocals on the album (or at least on a super-secret, previously unreleased version of it), I personally have always liked Attila’s vocal work on DMDS. Yes. It is weird. But who better to get to do vocals on songs written by a man who died in his “I Heart Transylvania” shirt than a brilliant Hungarian musician with an impressive track record (Tormentor was quite a big deal. That pesky Iron Curtain kept getting in the way, though)? The vocals are unconventional, yes, but they are creepy as hell, and considering the legacy that Attila was acting as a part of, creepy far outweighs traditional. Plus, his chanting on the title track is chill-inducing.

But vocals aren’t the only big deal with DMDS. We also must pay homage to the musical stylings of black metal’s godfather himself, Euronymous, whose intentionally-shitty-sounding tri-tone chord spawned an entire subgenre. De Mysteriis was dedicated to Euronymous,- who died before it was released- and rightfully so; while Deathcrush is absolutely fantastic, it doesn’t represent the second-wave that has, for the most part, become synonymous with the entire subgenre in the way that DMDS does.

And of course those drums. The thing that got me. Hellhammer is a god on the kit, and I am a firm believer in the suggestion that the album that became the defining line for black metal in the 90s would not have existed in the same form without Hellhammer’s musicianship. It certainly would have never seen the light of day without his determination to push through and get the damned thing done, despite the horrific hardships that plagued the band.

There are a million reasons why De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas deserves a birthday notice, even if it is a little bit late. That bass riff on Pagan Fears is simply one of them (I figured I’d throw a bass shoutout in there, even though I don’t have a very high opinion of Mr. Vikernes and Necrobutcher didn’t play on the album). However, perhaps it’s greatest accomplishment is its monumental status as a relic representing both the birth of a new era and the demise of an older one.

Well, that, and the fact that, despite two horrendously violent deaths, jail sentences, Iron Curtains, and enough disharmony to fuel the powder keg that was Mayhem in the late 80s and early 90s, we actually have an album like De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas to listen to.

-H